ANTI GUN
Your source for military surplus.

French MAS 49/56 Rifle Caliber 7.5 French

INFO ONLY. NOT FOR SALE. P9-5

Century Arms Import, Includes Bayonet, 4 magazines, Night Sight and Sling.

Type Semi-automatic rifle
Place of origin France
Service history
In service 1951-1979
Used by France, Syria
Wars First Indochina War, Algerian War of Independence, Suez Crisis, Vietnam War

Production history
Produced 1951-65

Specifications
Weight 4.7 kg (10 lb 6 oz) Length 1100 mm (43.3 in) Barrel length 580 mm (22.83 in)

Cartridge 7.5 × 54 mm French
Action direct impingement gas operation
Rate of fire Semi-automatic
Feed system 10 or 18 round detachable box magazine
Sights iron sights, removable APX(SOM) telescopic sights.

The MAS-49 is a French-designed semi-automatic infantry rifle that replaced the motley collection of aging bolt-action rifles (MAS-36, U.S. M1917, and captured German Kar98k) that were in French service after the end of World War II. It was manufactured by MAS (an abbreviation of Manufacture d'armes de Saint-Étienne - one of several government-owned arms factories in France).

The MAS-49, in 7.5x54 French caliber, evolved from the prototype MAS-38/39 and MAS-40 (which entered service in March 1940), followed by the MAS-44, 44A and 44B. It saw significant service with French troops in the latter stages of the First Indochina War, as well as the early stages of the Algerian War of Independence and the Suez Crisis.

Like the French experimental Rossignol ENT B5 rifle (1901), the Swedish AG-42 Ljungman semi-automatic rifle and the later U.S. M16 assault rifle, the MAS-49 and MAS-49/56 employ the direct impingement gas system, which actuates a tilt-locking bolt (like that of the Russian SKS) The MAS-49 and MAS-49/56 both use a 10-round detachable magazine. An 18-round magazine was also produced in very limited numbers. Both rifle models are equipped with a rail on the left side of the receiver. It allows for the immediate installation of an APX 806L(SOM) telescopic sight by sliding it into place and then locking it in with a small pressure lever.

The MAS direct impingement design had reduced the number of bolt moving parts to only 6: the bolt carrier, then the bolt proper which carries the extractor, the ejector and the firing pin, and lastly the recoil spring. Disassembly of the entire bolt mechanism,for cleaning purposes, takes only a few seconds. The MAS-49 had a reputation for reliability in conditions of poor maintenance, sometimes being cleaned with nothing more than rags and motor oil. The rifle could also endure harsh service environments (MAS rifles saw service in Algeria, Djibouti, Indochina, and French Guiana).

Variants An improved version called the MAS-49/56 was introduced in 1957 and incorporated lessons learned from service in Algeria, Indochina, and the Suez Crisis. The rifle was shortened and lightened to improve mobility for mechanized and airborne troops, and a knife bayonet was added. The MAS 49 built-in grenade launcher was replaced by a combination rifle grenade launcher/compensator. The MAS-49/56 ended production in 1980 and was replaced with the 5.56 x 45 mm NATO caliber FAMAS bullpup assault rifle. It was withdrawn from service in 1990.

Many MAS-49/56 rifles imported as surplus in the USA had been rechambered locally by Century Arms International to fire the 7.62x51mm NATO round, but several user reports have noted this conversion was unsatisfactory (resulting in numerous action stoppages and misfires) due to bad workmanship. The shortening of the barrel to allow rechambering brings the gas vent closer to the chamber hence creating a higher stress on the bolt carrier. In addition to these conversions of imported rifles, approximately 250 MAS-49/56 rifles were converted in France to 7.62 NATO for use by the Sűreté Nationale (National Police). These rifles are not known to have the reliability issues that plague the later Century conversions.

Another point worth noting is that some modern commercial 7.5x54mm "French" ammunition made in countries other than France for current commercial distribution have been known to produce burst fire (2 or 3 rounds at a time) because of more sensitive primers. The original heavy steel firing pins on the MAS-49 and 49/56 can be replaced by commercial titanium firing pins which are much lighter and generally cure the problem of burst fire on these weapons. It is also possible to prevent these slamfires by shortening the firing pin by approximately 0.5mm, or by modifying the bolt to accommodate a firing pin return spring.

MAS-49 rifles produced for Syria differed slightly from the French model, having a spike bayonet identical to that of the MAS-36 bolt-action rifle.


Sold Out
  • Model: INFO ONLY
  • 0 Units in Stock

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS
WARNING: THIS PRODUCT CAN EXPOSE YOU TO CHEMICALS INCLUDING LEAD, WHICH IS KNOWN TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO CAUSE CANCER AND BIRTH DEFECTS OR OTHER REPRODUCTIVE HARM. FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO WWW.P65WARNINGS.CA.GOV
This product was added to our catalog on Sunday 01 March, 2009.

Your IP Address is: 54.165.57.161
Copyright © 2021 Buymilsurp.com Online Store. Powered by Zen Cart
Parse Time: 0.340 - Number of Queries: 369 - Query Time: 0.139507700668