ANTI GUN
Your source for military surplus.

Spanish CETME 7.62X51 Rifle

INFO ONLY. NOT FOT SALE. P13-13

Overall EXC Condition, EXC Bore,

Type Battle rifle
Place of origin Spain

Service history
In service 1958–1982 (Spain)
Used by Spain/others
Production history

Designer CETME, Mauser, Heckler & Koch
Designed 1950s
Manufacturer CETME
Variants A, B, C, L, LC, LV

Specifications
Cartridge 7.62x51mm NATO
Action Roller-delayed blowback
Rate of fire 600 round/min
Muzzle velocity 790 m/s (2,600 ft/s)
Effective range 500 m (546 yd)
Feed system 20-round detachable box magazine
Sights Rear: rotary diopter; front: hooded post

The name CETME is an acronym for Centro de Estudios Técnicos de Materiales Especiales, a Spanish government design and development establishment. The CETME rifle, which was initially trialed with other calibers, but eventually chambered for 7.62x51mm NATO caliber, was designed primarily by the German engineer, Ludwig Vorgrimmler, who based his model on a late WWII German prototype assault rifle, the experimental StG45(M). The StG45 used a roller-delayed blowback mechanism somewhat similar to the roller-locking system patented by the Edward Stecke in the 1930s in Poland and used in the MG42. The MG42 locking system actually locks completely and requires a moving barrel that travels backwards to unlock, compared to the STG45 system that never completely locks and does not require a moving barrel.

Manufactured in Spain from 1957, the CETME served as a blueprint for the German Heckler & Koch G3 series of battle rifles. The CETME features roller-delayed blowback operation, which it shares with many German weapons. The CETME rifle was manufactured in five models, the A, B, C, L , LC and LV models. The primary difference in the three first models is the absence of bipod and less weight C model, with more wood. The L series was the "light", modern 5.56 NATO assault rifles with composite materials, the LC was the short version of it, and the LV was an improved, and last version of CETME L.

The CETME, like its descendant, the Heckler & Koch G3, is of modular construction, based around a stamped steel receiver, a pressed in barrel, and a detachable 'trigger group' which encompasses the handgrip, trigger, and fire selector mechanism. Its folding charging handle is mounted on the left side of the weapon, above the barrel and forend of the stock. The CETME does not have a bolt hold-open device. When the final cartridge is fired, the bolt does not remain open, and thus the rifleman cannot tell if he has expended his ammunition. Not using such a device allowed the CETME design to contain fewer moving parts and may make it more reliable. To signal when a magazine is near empty, the final rounds can instead be loaded with tracer rounds.

The magazines are made of steel. In military service the CETME's magazine was typically of twenty-round capacity, though five-round magazines were manufactured for garrison duty and aftermarket five-round magazines are available on the civilian market due to restrictions on magazine size in hunting rifles in the US. The magazine was removed via a "flapper" behind the magazine and forward of the trigger guard. This was pushed forward, dropping the magazine. Magazines from the H&K G3 can also be used in the CETME, though minor modifications may be needed.

Stripping of the weapon is achieved by pushing two small pins from the buttstock, removing the buttstock and recoil spring, pulling the trigger pack down, and pulling back the charging handle to push the bolt out of the rifle.

Century International Arms, Inc. formerly of Fairfax, Vermont, then Georgia, Vermont, and currently of Delray Beach, Florida, imported the majority of CETME rifles into the United States. As their manual states, "The CETME Rifle is built using genuine CETME parts and a U.S. manufactured receiver. The CETME conforms to B.A.T.F. requirements. It is semi-automatic only." Specifically, in order to import an automatic firearm into the United States for civilians (Government entities are exempt from nearly all firearms laws), the fully automatic receiver must be destroyed, and a certain number of US manufactured parts must be substituted. Specifically, from a list of twenty parts, no more than ten may be of foreign manufacture (see BATFE's sec.922r). In the case of the Century CETME, the receiver, trigger group, muzzle attachments and plastic furniture are of US manufacture, so the Century CETME complies with regulations. Unfortunately, the Century CETME "clone" is so far removed from the original CETME in quality and operation that its function can not be assured by the company, and their reputation has suffered. In the 1960s, the company MARS imported the semi-auto CETME into the US for the sporting market, with original Spanish receiver parts. These early import CETMEs are quite rare and robust, and fetch a price approaching 5-6 times that of a Century CETME.


Sold Out
  • Model: INFO ONLY
  • 0 Units in Stock

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS
WARNING: THIS PRODUCT CAN EXPOSE YOU TO CHEMICALS INCLUDING LEAD, WHICH IS KNOWN TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO CAUSE CANCER AND BIRTH DEFECTS OR OTHER REPRODUCTIVE HARM. FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO WWW.P65WARNINGS.CA.GOV
This product was added to our catalog on Friday 13 November, 2009.

Your IP Address is: 3.239.158.36
Copyright © 2021 Buymilsurp.com Online Store. Powered by Zen Cart
Parse Time: 0.534 - Number of Queries: 377 - Query Time: 0.223243518661